Categories
Daily Life Productivity Booster

2021

This is the week where it’s quieter and I look back on what happened this year and start to think about what 2022 might be about. There’s the things I have to work on, the things I want to work on, financial goals, family things, and some recreation so I still feel like I have a life in spite of pandemics, coup attempts, etc.

On the family front it was a good year, managing everyone’s heath issues is not a lot of fun as part of the sandwich generation but we’re doing ok. We did not get to go to Michigan this year thanks to the pandemic so hopefully that will happen in 2022.

Financially it was mostly good, which I rate as absolutely fantastic as everything else was bonkers. Of course the kids’ college fund could always be better funded so that’s a goal not completed. The only big work thing was that I wanted to start writing my next book on a concept I’ve been kicking around but I never made time for that. Like many people my cooking game has leveled up on a number of fronts and I’m not sure if I’d trade that for having a manuscript done. This past year has clearly demonstrated that time around the table with family is never guaranteed so I’m going to think hard over the next few days about what’s next for writing but maybe that could be shelved to post pandemic. On the other hand, the idea of doing some kind of MoC Conference (live unless the pandemic requires virtual, and I’m starting to think it’s going to be virtual) does have me excited so I’ve got to think about that too.

Personally it was a good year for preventative medicine, I caught up on all the doctor appointments that had been override by toddlers, then pandemic. I was about 75% as active as I wanted to be, I did get plenty of excercise but the Falmouth Road Race was not in the cards and I really need to find a Yoga class, I’ve reached the point where I can no longer stand the videos I’ve used for years so that needs to change in 2022 before I’m so stiff and inflexible that I break a hip or something.

Overall this year was a B+ and then factoring in all the turmoil, pandemic, and struggles I’ve seen my neighbors go through, it reminds me how fortunate I am and hopefully we can continue to succeed on our own fronts and help others do the same in the new year.

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Geek Stuff Productivity Booster

Answering Nerd Gift Questions

It’s the most wonderful time of year! My friends and relatives ask me questions about HDMI cables and memory cards, stuff they want nothing to do with for the other 11 months of the year.

Here’s the most common questions I’ve been getting so that I can just email this link around.

What video game system do I get?

The PS5 is still in short supply, but for hardcore fans of the platform they may not consider anything else. If your gamer is into playing Halo then Xbox may be an option, I would not assume so unless they say so.

I’m suggesting the Nintendo Switch for most people. It’s not as powerful as the previous two but the killer feature is that it is both a console (looks great hooked up to a TV) and can be used as a handheld game (fully portable for creating silence in the car. You’re welcome.)

There are multiple versions of the Switch so it can be confusing. The newest version has an OLED Screen and it’s the one I recommend. The original version is $50 less most places I’ve seen it and that’s not much of a discount for what’s basically 4 years old. The Switch Lite is smaller and cheaper but does not output to a TV which is a dealbreaker for me.

What Do I Need To Buy With A Nintendo Switch?

Games of course. An important point here is you can now choose between buying games from the store in memory cards or just downloading them.

I prefer download because they never get lost. They cards are only the size of a postage stamp and that’s just asking for disaster in my house. If your gamer is a neat and tidy person there is the upside of being able to resell games on memory cards when they are done with them if they like to trade up. For downloaded games that’s the end of the line, you have no access to the used market.

You can buy Nintendo eStore cards all over the place, good games that are new tend to run around $60. Target is currently running a buy one, get 15% off the second on a bunch of video game platform gift cards.

A tip here – our local library network does lend Nintendo Switch games. It’s always great to try them before buying, some games just suck, others can be completed before it has to go back to the library. This can save a huge pile of cash.

Nintendo Switch also has a gaming network, this allows you to play with other gamers online and gives access to a library of a bunch of games from previous Nintendo systems (current Wii games are not in there though.) This is $20 a year for an individual or $35 for the family. This is a cheap way to have a ton of games right from day 1 without breaking the bank.

Nintendo Switch Controllers

The small controllers are the weak point on the platform. They work but they can’t handle the long term abuse that controllers normally get. If your gamer is tough on controllers (like ragequit throwing) a Pro Controller is a required upgrade. It’s very much in the platform gamer standard, strong enough to easily break a TV when tossed and will survive.

I have tried a few upgraded controllers that attach like the stock ones. This Kinvoca Joypad has worked well and not broken as fast as the original.

If you have the original controllers and they are not working, most commonly by “drifting” where things move without you touching the stick, or if you can’t move in certain directions, they can be repaired if you are a little bit handy and not afraid to void your warranty. I have used more than one of these joystick replacement kits that come with all the tools and parts you need.

Get A Memory Card and Screen Protectors

If you are going the downloaded games route you’ll want to add more storage. This is a good memory card.

My kids manage to crack the screen protector every 3 months or so, making screen protectors the best purchase I’ve made with the system, these come in a three pack so we’re never without one.

Smart Light Bulbs and Smart Home

There are a lot of Smart Home Options, we use Alexa for everything since it works with Smart Outlets (Alexa, turn off Christmas tree is a big win.)

Phillips Hue Light Bulbs are expensive compared to the competition but they have a good app and integrate with Alexa. Note that there are bulbs that do different shades of white and brightness and then more expensive ones that can do the full color spectrum. Phillips has a starter kit on sale for the holidays, and my local warehouse club has them.

I have a Google Nest Smart Thermostat, it is only ok. It’s limited if you want to use sensors to adjust the temp by room (at night I want the heat to go on based on the bedroom temp, not the temp downstairs.) If you have one you like please mention it!

TV and Home Theater

This space is crazy, everything has become so cheap. I like buying TVs from the warehouse club (or Best Buy if you still have one close to you) so you can see them to pick, compare, and make sure it fits in your house (also confirm it will fit in your car/truck to go home before you pay.)

TV’s are cheap but the LED revolution has made projectors affordable too. Adding a projector to our living room has changed the game, I don’t like watching the TV anymore and because of the scale it’s better than going to the movies. I’ve already done a post about that if you want to see how I got it together for a screen over 100 inches for less than the price of a 47 inch TV.

Phones

Everyone here is getting upgraded because we are in a rural area and some carriers shutting down 3G is going to be a problem so everybody is getting a 5G upgrade. The real fun here is that I won’t know if this will make life better or worse until we try. It astounds me every day that I live in a town with a top rated liberal arts college and have crappy cell/internet, but here we are.

Headphones, Earphones, Earbuds

There’s a lot going on in this space but the short version is that the Jabra Active Elite 75T are ranked #1 by many review sites and I can agree. Better sound quality than AirPods, great microphones for calls. But, remember there’s no one size fits all, there’s a bunch of reasons why you might want to use something else (number one being not wanting to force something into your ear canal.)

Unfortunately the Active Elite 75T is being phased out and I have not tried any of the new line to know what the best successor is. Right now I would suggest the 85T until the new stuff has been reviewed.

Always happy to talk this topic or…

Trusted Review Sites

I’m a paying member of Consumer Reports for appliances and cars. The Wirecutter is fantastic for trying hundreds of products and recommending the best (Lauren Dragan on headphones!)

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Productivity Booster

The Marketing Over Coffee Playbook!

I’m very happy to announce that the Marketing Over Coffee playbook is now available!

For everyone familiar with the show the book will be no surprise – quick and easy to understand segments on everything going on at the intersection of marketing and technology.

It’s available on Amazon here. Or you can get more details on the landing page.

This is my second book and (hopefully) a lot more mainstream business than B2B Marketing Confessions. I have to thank Editor Carol for all her work on this project, it could not have come together without her.

Categories
Productivity Booster

Not Being A Trade Show Zombie

This was a post that I had done for another company as part of a campaign. For some reason I can’t remember, we didn’t end up doing business with them. After sitting in my drafts folder for a couple of years I thought I’d throw it out there are this week’s #FriLearning  Enjoy your weekend!
 
Here’s how to fail at trade shows:
  1. Set up your “Professional” looking booth
  2. Show up at the show and hope to find some leads
  3. Bring home some business cards
  4. Maybe close a deal or two

What about the winners?

They Get Seen. When people are walking the show floor there are two states of mind – The Beta state is the normal zombie state of anybody walking the streets. Not really paying attention to anything, having that normal monologue going on in their head. Alpha state is when you snap somebody out of Beta and they are paying direct attention. They are talking to someone, reading something – they are now fully focused and not paying attention to everything else going on around them. Step one to winning – get them to Alpha. As far as the booth is concerned, looking “Professional” is code for “Unremarkable” and a recipe to fail. Work with your marketing team to create a remarkable booth, shocking, offbeat, casual, whatever as long as it doesn’t look like everyone else on the row. Two easy tricks – hire a chair massage, or just pay the extra $100 for super thick floor padding for those shows where everybody has to walk 5 miles of show floor a day.

Signage is important, do what you can within your budget, but optimum would be huge overhead that can be seen anywhere on the floor. A masthead that can be read on the whole aisle. The key here is to keep getting the text smaller as you go lower to literally pull people into your booth.

They Have A Hook. What makes them remarkable also connects to their story. “Sure, you can have a 5 minute shoulder rub, c’mon over here. We’ve been working with this spa for 3 years handling all their accounting, do you get help with your accounting?” Yes. Even an accountant can have a remarkable booth and story.

They Have Appointments Set. The 3 months before the show is where the winners are determined. Winning organizations already have a list of appointments and even a few deals in the pipe before their plane lands in town. These players know that the show will pay for itself before the booth is set up. Don’t be afraid to outsource appointment setting, use a calling automation tool, or a virtual assistant to both set appointments and monitor social media to filter through attendees who are mentioning the show beforehand to determine who might be a prospect.

They Do Biz Dev. For shows where you don’t get the attendee list, find two or three exhibitors with complimentary products and either trade leads or band together and do a follow up event like a webinar that you can all use as opportunity to contact your leads. I’ve found that these leads from other exhibitors to perform even better than leads that visited the booth at many events.
 
Their Giveaways Generate Traffic. Don’t make the mistake everyone makes of pens, candy or other “From the Far East to the Landfill” giveaways (stress ball anyone?) Give away something $50+ but only to qualified leads. Somebody who can buy your six-figure business intelligence software? Yeah, that’s worth some Bose Headphones if they’re willing to take 10 minutes to check it out on the floor. Wait and see how many people will line up for a Bluetooth travel speaker. Have some candy around for those who don’t qualify…
 
They Don’t Take No For An Answer. What if you don’t have the six-figure budget for that huge event? Be a Lobby Rat, invite a prospect for a drink after the sessions at the hotel across the street. Suitcase it – sign up for the free expo badge and meet a prospect after one of the big keynotes. Outboarding is also another effective tactic – instead of a $10,000 4×4 booth you could take 5 prospects for the finest steak in town that night for a legendary event.
 
Best of luck at your next event!
 
 
Categories
Productivity Booster

SEO and Trade Show Tips

 

Just trying something new – this is the roundup of topics from Marketing Over Coffee. If you’d like to get these emailed to you, just subscribe here.

This Week’s Podcast

In which we use insider lingo

Click to listen!


Google Releases Search Quality Rating Guidelines

A 160-page PDF document, aimed at helping Google Search Quality Raters understand how to rate the search results they are testing. Along with this resource we also discussed SEO by the Sea one of the best search blogs out there.


The Unreal Environment of a Trade Show Floor

David Spark talks about his new book Three Feet from Seven Figures! Bad behavior, ludicrous amounts of money and a compressed timeframe are problems for the “Always on” in the “unreal environment of a trade show floor”


Going Beyond Lead Scoring

So you’ve got a lead scoring system set up, what next? Infer lays out where this space is going and what to consider when you want to get beyond just a number.


Your Chance to Show Gratitude for the Holiday

Wondering how you can put a dent in the universe? The answer is so simple, an iTunes review for Marketing Over Coffee.

 

 

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Productivity Booster

That’s Not Funny

In September it will be two years since the release of B2B Marketing Confessions. I spent the year after it was published on promotion and working on the audio version of the book, and then it was time to start the next big thing.

After writing about one of the most boring business topics of all time I was excited to get working on a concept that came to me before Confessions was done – the intersection of business and humor. The big ideas were clear – the question of why things are funny is a fertile topic, and the mirage of the “viral video” that every marketing department chases at at least once (if not dozens of times) is often ridden towards on the camel of humor.

After over a year of research I bring you… nothing.

Or, maybe this is a true gift, a blog post with a few good points as opposed to a 200 page book with 195 pages of filler. What I have learned that is important, but not enough for a book:

  1. There is no formula for funny.
  2. Like chess, there are some proven openings, but you have to do the hard work of filling in the details and there’s no guarantee you’ll get it right (in fact you won’t most of the time as you start). And get this – comedy case studies are useless, once the joke is out copycats are viewed with disdain.
  3. At the heart of comedy is the irony of us being woefully unable to deal with everyday life. For more on this, Steve Kaplan’s “The Hidden Tools of Comedy” is worth reading.
  4. Brute force does work. As a young person I thought Johnny Carson was just an amazingly funny guy, then I learned there are teams of people that drive the late night shows. I don’t know why this was so surprising to me, I was also amazed to hear about the same thing about This American Life, only about half of the segments that get made make it to the airwaves.
  5. Committees never work, it may be funny, but not funny enough to go viral. This is the bane of corporate humor. Pretty good for 10 people is not even in the same country, never mind neighborhood of awesome to 1. Even great to 4 people will probably be ignored.
  6. Humor never works when there is power disparity – making jokes when you are laying someone off is a bad idea. If you are the big boss you may be in for a rude awakening when you tell the same jokes and stories to people not on your payroll.
  7. Humor runs the risk of being offensive. As mentioned earlier, a lot of humor is about our inability to deal with life. That’s why there are a lot of victims in comedy and that doesn’t always mesh with political correctness or the PR position of your brand.
  8. Much of business is improvisation. I thought there would be a lot of material here. There are a bunch of books on improvisational comedy. 99% of it boils down to working well with your partners and some generally agreed to frameworks (again back to the chess openings). The other theme here that keeps showing up is: do a ton of writing.
  9. “Be funny” is like saying, “be charming, be empathic, be service oriented, be a great product designer”. Good advice at first listen, until you realize that there aren’t any detailed instructions besides “Listen well, and act appropriately”.
  10. To do one great video, create 10 maybe you’ll be lucky and get one hit. Doing projects one at a time guarantees failure.

Although there’s no getting the year back, I did learn a lot and it may have led me to the next idea. I keep coming back to the art and science of marketing. The big idea there highlights the weakness of comedy: comedy is an art and without the science of connecting it in some way to your product, it’s entirely possible to create something successful (even viral baby!) that drives ZERO sales. I get that zero sales feeling from Comedy & Business, so it’s time to apply some science.

Categories
Productivity Booster

Recent Marketing Resources

I caught up with a friend for lunch at The Merchant yesterday, which is a hot lunch spot right now. It’s always fun to watch the responses people give when the host informs them that unless they have a reservation they are out of luck.

I’m able to get advice from both a seasoned entrepreneur and parent, and he gets the benefit what’s come out of Marketing Over Coffee, distilled down to what tools or tech might be useful for specifically his business. And, when I start writing long winded emails full of links I figure I might as well take the general stuff and share it with the whole world.

Google Analytics is changing so fast it makes my head hurt. That’s disconcerting considering number of years I’ve worked with web analytics. I feel bad for someone digging in for the first time. The good news is there’s Training and Certification here, and some good ongoing stuff published here.

I haven’t gotten around to posting the transcript of my talk with Simon Sinek on his new book, Leaders Eat Last. That link goes to his book, and here’s one to his first book, Start With Why, which is fantastic. If you want to get an overview on both of them you can listen here on Leaders Eat Last, and here for Start With Why.

We’ve also been using Slack at Qrious and it’s great. Sort of like having your own private Facebook for work. If you know Salesforce.com it’s like Chatter.

Anything new and interesting in your toolkit?

 

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Productivity Booster

4 Keys to The Art of Blogging

This is the second of two posts on the Art and Science of Blogging, a series created to run as part of #blogchat You can check out part 1, “4 Keys to The Science of Blogging” here.

We had to cover the Science of blogging first because that’s where all the rules get made. Now we get to talk about Art, where the rules can be broken – for example, this series should be “The Science and Art of Blogging” since that’s the order we are covering it, but “The Art and Science of Blogging” is more pleasant to the ear, so we had to get crazy and take them out of order.

According to dictionary.com Art is “the quality, production, expression, or realm, according to aesthetic principles, of what is beautiful, appealing, or of more than ordinary significance”

So where to focus to make our blogging “of more than ordinary significance”?

The Art of Creating Experience

We touched on this last week when we talked about “Creating a System.” Think about what your readers are going to do, where they are going to go when they visit your site. Create a “Happy Path” for them. What would be best for both you and them to experience? At the heart of this is asking why you are blogging. Is it just to tell your story, or do you want to motivate your audience, enthuse them or teach them?

The two keys here are to wireframe – actually draw a map before you start building, and testing. Having a map and then getting 3rd party verification that everything works are the only ways to prove the park ride is working.

The Art of Web Design

Choosing the proper colors, fonts, and page layouts require an artistic eye. There are many rules of design that can help you make your site more effective but ultimately you are painting a picture. Unfortunately for us it’s going to render differently on all kinds of devices making this infinitely more challenging than a canvas.

Your site is the user interface (UI) to your content. The ultimate goal of UI would be that it is intuitive – when someone sits down at your site for the first time, everything does what the user thinks it should do. Of course our expectations of a UI are always in motion. Until recently I would always expect a keyboard and mouse. My son it tapping and swiping on the TV and getting angry that nothing’s happening. The ultimate artistry here is creating the new standards for interface elements. What will we do to control our iWatches? Motions to control holographic interfaces? Those controlled by eye or voice?

Keys here – use complementary colors, put readability first in font choice, in layout always err on the side of less (simplicity reigns). For UI – steal from the masters.

The Art of Images

Unless you’re running something like a photo or travel blog, images are not required. And yet the right images can clearly make a blog a piece of art, while poor or dated graphics may cause some to look on your content with a doubtful eye. Can I really trust this information that looks like it was written in 1998?

It’s funny how most blog templates try to fool you by going with a “Less is More” layout. That does work really well if you have some National Geographic level photos, suddenly when you start slapping in your own images the template doesn’t seem so cool. The good news is you can release plenty of photography smack down with just an iPhone and a little work.Mona_Lisa

Quick tricks to improve your images: Understand the Rule of Thirds, use black and white for drama and to hide imperfections. Get at least a basic understanding of Photoshop, or GIMP if you don’t want to pay anything. The greatest productivity boost to my blogging (and marketing career overall) was to learn Photoshop. Other photo tricks with high bang for your learning buck: HDR and adding sharpness.

The Art of Writing

We end here with the greatest challenge the blogger and author have always faced: the blank page. Writing compelling copy is the blogger’s core competence. In truth, you could find someone to do every other part of this process but it’s the writing that’s your fingerprint, your stamp on the project that nobody else can replicate.

I do not put myself forth as a writing expert (for the love of god, I was trained as an economist, many consider that being a professional liar), but as a marketer there are some tricks you can use to improve how you write:

Start with your own voice. Write as if you were talking, there’s never been anyone that’s suffered from “Talker’s Block”. If you’re stuck just keep writing, you’ll get something good on the page and even if it’s just one sentence out of two pages, that’s enough to make your next session productive.

Use the proper voice for the situation. The voice you choose will set the scene. I love Lawrence Fishburne’s character in “The Matrix”. Although it’s a Sci-Fi action rollercoaster ride his voice is slow and deliberate, a rich deep tone with perfect elocution. Here is art in action. By breaking the rules with this voice in that scene you can’t help but be enraptured.  So ask “Does the voice I’m using match the scenery in my blog? Should it?”

The masters that I have been fortunate enough to work with in marketing have all had the same technique – use the active voice, and cut out half the words that are not really providing any value. It can never be too succinct or clean. Check out writing from the King of the Mad Men, David Ogilvy for more here.

To read more about practicing your art in today’s society you might want to check out this interview with Seth Godin. If you enjoy listening to audio, the interview is here.

Finally, thanks for taking part in #blogchat with me and I hope you’ve found our discussion useful. The audio edition of my book, Marketing Confessions, was just released this week. I’ve created a pdf of a few sample chapters for everyone from blogchat if you’d like to check it out or pass it along to your favorite marketing person.

Thanks,
@johnjwall

Categories
Productivity Booster

Audio Confessions!

B2BMarkConfes copyB2B Marketing Confessions is now available as an audiobook! I know it’s absurd that a guy with a podcast needs a year to get the audio version of his book done, but that’s how the chips fell.

The blurb: What’s the Truth About Marketing? Contrary to the popular belief that marketing is advertising, listen to the confessions of an insider to learn how marketing affects every step of the customer lifecycle. From product design, to building awarness, selling, and keeping customers happy, this book covers all the basic principles and gives you tactics, tips and tricks to succeed (including best practices for Salesforce.com)!

Reviews:
Star Rating: 4.5 out of 5 – San Francisco Book Review

“…one of the many wonderful things about B2B Marketing Confessions: it is accessible and useful to everyone.”
B2B Marketing Confessions is exceptional. Wall describes everything you could ever want to know about the modern-day marketing process. Whether you are a professional marketer or an entrepreneur with a big idea and no employees (yet), you should read this book. I have no doubt that you will find Wall’s advice easy to understand and exciting to put to use.”

Available at:

Amazon (via Audible)

iTunes

Audible (Get it free if you start a 30 day trial)

Dead tree and Kindle versions here

I’m working hard to promote it this month so if you are looking for an interview subject, webinar host or presenter, or speaker I’m ready for your group, association or nursing home!

 

 

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Productivity Booster

4 Keys to The Science of Blogging

This Week (Sunday, March 9, 9pm EST) in Mack Collier’s #blogchat we’ll be talking about “The Art and Science of Blogging.” Blogging covers a huge spectrum of skills, everything from configuring your servers and domain name to web analytics, to coming up with the graphic design and color scheme for your blog (but thankfully, it’s easy to outsource or use tools for all of this). If you have time left after all that, you may even do some writing.

I use the word “Science” simply to emphasize experimentation and (hopefully) repeatable results. For our purposes we can use the experiments other people have done to make our blogs better.

Week 2 will cover the “Art” side of the discussion. That part is more fun than science but there’s a reason why you have to put science first, and that will a big part of the second week’s discussion. Although you can steal all the scientific results for your own gain, once you start stealing someone else’s art you become a cheap knockoff.

The Keys:

  1. Follow “The Rules”
  2. Build the System
  3. Measure Everything
  4. Always Be Testing/Closing/Selling

Follow “The Rules” As you begin your study of blogging you will look to “The Rules” to guide you and keep you from getting in your own way. For example, in the past you didn’t have to think much about how your blog would look on a phone but with the huge explosion of handheld devices, it’s not uncommon to hear of sites having more than half of their traffic coming from mobile. In other words – if you tune your blog so it also looks great on mobile platforms, you could double your current results. We don’t need to spend much time here, you’re smart enough to be hanging out in #blogchat so you get this.

Build the System There’s no substitute for climbing the learning curve. You’ll probably never learn as much about blogging in as short a time as when you get your blog together and do your first 10 posts. An important point to remember here is that your blog is unique. You want it to be remarkable.

Once your blog is up and running ask: “Are you treating your readers right?” To maximize your odds for success make sure your readers can easily do what they want to do, and they have a great experience when they visit your blog. It astounds me how many great blogs don’t have  links to their most popular posts. For many blogs the best meat is buried where only Google can find it. Yet out of the other side of my mouth, while this mission has been accomplished over at Marketing Over Coffee, this blog doesn’t have an easy to use archive or Top 10 page (cobbler’s kids and all that, yadda yadda.)

Bonus links: Additional Reading on User Interfaces (UI), and User Experience (UX)

Measure Everything –  We could talk for days about Google Analytics. Maybe we can at least get through the 3 key areas in our hour together:

  1. Acquisition – where do your site visitors come from? More importantly what could you do to find more of them?
  2. Behavior –  what do users do when they get to your site?
  3. Conversion- the critical point that separates the general audience from customers, for lack of a better term.

Google analytics gives you the data to fuel your experiments and gives you hooks into other advertising options and systems at the right price. Check out this post from Christopher S. Penn for more on the ABC’s.microscope

Additional Reading: The Godfather in this space is Avinash Kaushik, and he’s given us a clear map of the path to awesomeness. Learn the path, live the path, love the path. He offers 2 ladders, the first outlining what to do to make a killer web presence, and the other outlining what to measure.

Always Be Testing/Closing/Selling – There are two sides to this coin – one is that you should always be testing something, tweaking things to see what kind of trouble you can cause. On the other hand – you always have to be wary that it’s not cutting into your writing time. It may help to set a goal “I will test one variable a week” just to keep you from running amok (maybe one more post rather than a Blackberry template?)

Additional Reading:  If you are into coding check out the Google Analytics API for some crazy stuff you can do on the testing front.

Does this make sense? Have you got any theories you’ve proven or want to test? I’d love to hear from you this Sunday, March 9 on #blogchat my twitter name is @johnjwall see you then!